Your mental approach to sustainability is more important than your practical one  

Your mental approach to sustainability is more important than your practical one  

Did you know that since the 1970s, the earth’s vertebrae population has decreased by 58%? That is an enormous decline and one that stopped me in my tracks and made me think about my actions, attitudes and behaviours and ask myself a question… Have I contributed to that decline? 

The honest answer is almost certainly yes. Here’s how...

  • Buying the cheapest meat I could find at the major supermarkets

  • Buying meat, fruit and vegetables without paying attention to where they came from

  • Buying fruit and vegetables all year round with no care for what is in season

  • Buying and eating meat every single day

 

While careless things, they seem harmless. But the truth is each one leads to a whole host of other issues that create a very unsustainable consumer world.

Buying the cheapest meat from major supermarkets means I am paying no attention to the standards in which animals were produced, where they came from and how they arrived on the shelf.

Buying meat, fruit and vegetables without considering where they have come from means I may not be supporting good Australian farmers and it is likely that the produce was in transport for thousands of kilometers to arrive on my plate with detrimental environmental impacts.  

Buying fruit and vegetables all year round with no care for what is in season means I’m almost certainly not supporting Australian farmers – you can read more about this here.  

Buying and eating meat every single day, when combined with my product choice, means it is likely that deforestation and displacement of other animals had to happen to produce those animals.

Every single choice we make has a greater impact on the world around us. But, whether we actually stop to notice it is another thing all together.

This is what makes our mental approach to sustainability almost indefinitely more important than our practical one.

 

So here are some questions I would like you to stop and ask yourself the next time you are out grocery shopping…

  • Is this in season?

  • Which country does this product come from?

  • Do I know what breed of animal this meat is?

  • Does the butcher know how this animal was raised?

  • Was this grown organically?

 

If you stop, pause and ask yourself those questions before putting the product into your basket, you’ve taken the first step to being a more mindful consumer – and that is the first step to becoming a sustainable one.

What questions do you ask yourself when you shop to be a more mindful, conscious, sustainable consumer? Leave your answers in the comments below…

Choosing Ethical Kangaroo

Choosing Ethical Kangaroo

Meet the Aussie farmer finding the sweet spot between sustainability and profit

Meet the Aussie farmer finding the sweet spot between sustainability and profit