New Heart Foundation guidelines give milk the green light

New Heart Foundation guidelines give milk the green light

We live in a time where there is so much debate about what constitutes a healthy diet. Luckily, research bodies have helped us out by giving us clear guidelines on what we should be eating for optimal health. One of those bodies is the National Heart Foundation and they’ve given dairy the green light amidst a declining trend in popularity.

From their latest guidelines revision,

“We know that the fat in dairy foods can raise blood cholesterol, however new evidence shows that the effect depends on the type of dairy product you eat or drink.

How much dairy should you eat?

For healthy individuals, the risk of developing heart disease is not significantly increased by eating and consuming unflavoured milk, cheese and yoghurt as part of a heart-healthy diet. This means that you can choose between full-fat or reduced-fat varieties. However, if you have existing heart disease or have high cholesterol, we recommend you choose low-fat milk, yoghurt and cheese. Low-fat dairy foods are usually lower in kilojoules too.

The recommendation for milk, yoghurt and cheese does not extend to cream, butter and ice cream; these foods are not part of a heart-healthy eating pattern. This means you should avoid eating or cooking with butter. There are preferred options, such as olive oil, avocado, tahini and nut butters.”

These revised guidelines also include up to 350 grams of red meat each week and were supported by Nutrition Australia.

We think this is especially important to hear at a time when fad diets label milk as a “no-good” option for our healthy and the dairy industry is paying the price for it. So be smart, be healthy, follow the guidelines and you can enjoy milk!

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